Genetics Unzipped is the podcast from the Genetics Society - one of the oldest learned societies dedicated to supporting and promoting the research, teaching and application of genetics. Find out more and apply to join at genetics.org.uk

003 - Hunting Huntington's, Nobel viruses and spidergoats

003 - Hunting Huntington's, Nobel viruses and spidergoats

Kat: Hello, and welcome to Genetics Unzipped - the Genetics Society podcast, with me, Dr Kat Arney. In this episode from our series exploring 100 ideas in genetics, we’re hunting down Huntington’s disease, discovering why viruses are so important for geneticists, and chasing the science behind spidergoats.

Before we start, I just want to draw your attention to Gene-uary - excuse the terrible pun - particularly if you’re a fan of wacky gene names. Every day throughout January the Genetics Society will be tweeting about a different gene, so follow them at @gensocUK to get your fill of genetic fun, from Armadillo to Van Gogh.

New year, new you as they say. But if you’re determined to finally drop the pounds and get in shape in 2019, then genetics is here to help. Come along to the Royal Institution in central London on Friday 11th January at 7pm to hear Dr Giles Yeo talk about his new book, “Gene eating: the science of obesity and the truth about diets” to find out whether you can really blame your genes-with-a-G for the fact you can no longer fit into your jeans-with-a-J. Go to RIGB.org to buy tickets, and use the code in the podcast to get £6 off a standard ticket.

Every other episode of Genetics Unzipped, we’re going to be celebrating the Genetics Society’s centenary year by exploring some of the top 100 ideas in genetics. So sit back, and enjoy these three tales from the world of genes, genomes and DNA.

Hunting for Huntington’s

Click here for the script and references

Nobel viruses

Click here for the script and references

Spidergoats!

Click here for the script and references

Finally, you can still watch the fantastic Royal Institution Christmas lectures on iPlayer, in partnership with the Genetics Society and featuring the fantastic Alice Roberts, Aoife McLysaght and Fran Scott - all of whom appeared in the last episode of Genetics Unzipped to give us a sneak peek behind the scenes.

For more information about this podcast including show notes, transcripts, links, references and everything else head over to geneticsunzipped.com You can find us on Twitter @geneticsunzip or email us at podcast@geneticsunzipped.com with any questions and feedback. Please do take a minute to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts from, and it would be great if you could rate and review - and more importantly, please spread the word. Tell your friends, send out a tweet, and share the big biological love.

Genetics Unzipped is presented by me, Kat Arney, and produced by First Create the Media for the Genetics Society - one of the oldest learned societies in the world dedicated to supporting and promoting the research, teaching and application of genetics. You can find out more and apply to join at genetics.org.uk  Our theme music was composed by Dan Pollard, and the logo was designed by James Mayall, and that spidery song is Black Spider by Sunday Driver. Thanks for listening, and until next time, goodbye.

Music and SFX credits:

  • Anchors Aweigh, United States Marine Band, public domain

  • Bubbling Cauldron, Mike Koenig, Attribution 3.0

  • Maniacal Witches Laugh, Mike Koenig, Attribution 3.0

  • Bright idea, Geographer, public domain

  • 1 Person Cheering, Jett Rifkin, Attribution 3.0

  • The Throne Room, Sir Subworth, public domain

  • Maple Leaf Rag (1899, Z. Brewster-Geisz version) by Scott Joplin, public domain

  • Downtown Metropolis Chase by Aaron Kenny, public domain

  • Black Spider by Sunday Driver, used with permission

  • Goat Bah, BlastwaveFx.com, Attribution 3.0

  • All other sound effects: public domain

004 - Witness the fitness

004 - Witness the fitness

002 - Behind the scenes at the Christmas Lectures

002 - Behind the scenes at the Christmas Lectures